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Purchasing a used Daf XF105

Unveiled as the successor to the XF95 at the Amsterdam show in October 2005, production of the Daf XF105 started in January 2006. Whereas the XF95 had a Euro-3 XE 12.3-litre engine, the XF105 sported the new 12.9-litre MX, claimed to be up to 4% more economical. Early XF105 units were Euro-4, but Euro-5 versions were also available from the outset.

Purchasing a used Daf CF85

Daf launched the CF85, or the ‘compact forte’ , in late 1992, offering a smaller cab than the XF’s ‘extra forte’ . The 85 part of the designation was a logical follow-on from the short-lived Leyland Daf 80-series, which was essentially a hybrid that married a Leyland Roadtrain with Daf’s 11.6-litre WS engine.

Purchasing a used DAF LF

Daf’s LF45 7.5-tonner boasts astounding longevity and success. Its origins can be traced back 30 years to the Leyland Roadrunner of 1984, and it has been the UK’s top-selling 7.5-tonner since 2005.

Purchasing a used Scania R-series truck

The introduction of the R-series in spring 2004 marked a change in Scania’s model designation system. Out went chronological (1-,2-, 3- and 4-series) numbering, replaced by a prefix indicating cab-mounting height, followed by the engine power rating in hp. R-series, the highest cab mounting, was joined later in 2004 by P-series, the lowest. 

Purchasing a used Mercedes-Benz Atego

The launch of the new Euro-6 Mercedes-Benz Atego range at next week’s CV Show is the latest chapter in a story that started 15 years ago with the introduction of the first Atego in 1998, replacing Mercedes’ LK range. And Atego has changed remarkably little in those 15 years.

Purchasing a used Volvo FH

Volvo’s FH remains one of the industry’s flagship vehicles. We take a look at why it can make a sensible used purchase. Volvo’s FH tractor caused quite a stir when it was introduced in 1993.

6- to 7-tonne GVW vans

  7.5-tonne GVW trucks accounted for 28% of all new trucks over 3.5 tonnes GVW registered in the UK in 2000.

Truck engine oils

It’s not easy choosing engine oil: every oil seems to be seems to have an alphabet spaghetti of specifications and accreditations on its data sheet. Then there is all marketing hyperbole.