Scania P Series – 11 problems you need to know about

Scania P Series

Everything you need to know when thinking of buying a used Scania P320 truck

Finding “common” faults on any modern vehicle is becoming increasingly difficult, but the P320 took the challenge to a whole new level.

If you’re an operator running one of these and didn’t get a call from us, you’re in the minority, but having spoken to just about everyone in the country, we did eventually came up with 11 things that are worth keeping an eye out for.

Hover over and click on any of the points on the photo to find out more...


1. Seat pads: Operators using these vehicles for multidrop find them prone to early seat pad wear when drivers forget to let the air drop out of the seat before leaving the cab. (Back to image)

2. Software: Ensure any truck considered has had all the software updates completed – fuel efficiency will suffer if not. (Back to image)

3. Steering column: There are reports of failures in the steering column ram that lock the wheel upright. (Back to image)

4. Mirrors: Older examples with aluminium mirror arms are vulnerable to corrosion, resulting in the mirrors themselves rattling around. (Back to image)

5. Lockers: Where outer lockers are fitted, watch out for the cable used to open them having snapped, or showing signs of wear. (Back to image)

6. Suspension: Several examples of premature wear to suspension bushes and springs. Check whether or not this has already occurred. (Back to image)

7. Propshaft: Occasional instances where propshaft centre bearings need replacement. (Back to image)

8. Cab tilt rams: Some examples of cab tilt rams leaking. (Back to image)

9. Cam followers: Screws prone to breaking off the cam followers on examples with the DC09 5-cylinder engine. (Back to image)

10. Manual gearboxes: Some problems with synchros breaking up on manual gearboxes. (Back to image)

11. Opticruise: Examples of corrosion and breakage in the gearbox wiring looms of models with Opticruise transmission. (Back to image)


Additionally... If the vehicle is used with a truck-mounted forklift, or in any other application where the rear axle is kept down for the majority of the time, watch out for the airbags wearing out so the axle won’t lift at all – a fault easily missed if you haven’t been warned about it.