Eight applications and decisions that caught our eye this week

Wincanton construction logistics

Licences granted for James M Stuart Haulage, GIT Haulage and Beaches Logistics (Oxford) caught our attention this week.

  • Carrutherstown, Dumfries-based James M Stuart Haulage has been granted a licence for one lorry and one trailer but must provide evidence to the central licensing office of the necessary financial standing covering June, July and August by 30 September.
  • Haddington Hire Centre has been granted a licence for two lorries out of an operating centre in Haddington, East Lothian.
  • Wincanton Group has applied to increase its licence authorisation at its operating centre on the Oldends industrial estate in Stonehouse, Gloucestershire,to 20 HGVs and 35 trailers.
  • Healey Haulage in Weston-super-Mare wants to increase the number of vehicles it operates at its base in Banwell to three HGVs and three trailers.
  • GIT Haulage in Totton has been authorised to run five lorries and five trailers out of an operating centre in Burnetts Lane, West End, with ﷯a number of conditions attached to its licence.
  • A licence for 14 HGVs and eight trailers has been granted to Beaches Logistics (Oxford) operating out of a base in Oxford.
  • Gary Sansom & Partners has been granted a licence to run three lorries out of an operating centre in Dainton, Newton Abbot.
  • Priority Transport in Exeter has been granted a licence for a new operating centre on the Hill Barton Business Park, running 15 lorries and 15 trailers

Why not register for our Compliance Bulletin to receive the latest legal and fleet management advice fortnightly? Sign up free now

Skip firm pays price of waste con

A skip hire company owner who was conned by a rogue waste haulier has been hit with a £25,000 bill after his rubbish was fly-tipped at four sites in Essex. Robert Walker, of Bob’s Skips in Basildon, failed to check the legitimacy of a haulier who cold called his premises looking for a backload.

Chelmsford Magistrates’ Court heard how Walker had asked for waste transfer notices, but made no further enquiries about the haulier’s company and failed to notice the forms weren’t filled in properly. He had no idea where the waste was being taken, nor did he check it had arrived at its destination. Due to inaccurate paperwork, the lorry and driver have not been traced.

Prosecuting for the Environment Agency, Sarah Dunne said Walker had been reckless and breached the duty of care he had when managing waste. Walker admitted breaching the Environmental Protection Act and was fined £10,000, ordered to pay £8,300 towards the costs of the clean-up of the dumped waste, and £6,532 in costs. There was also a £30 victim surcharge.

Environment Agency officer Tom Pickover said: “We hope this sends out a clear message to waste operators that they cannot take a cavalier approach to its disposal.

“The duty of care rules are there to protect the environment and legitimate traders who want to do a good job of disposing of waste properly.”

  • Why not register for our Compliance Bulletin to receive the latest legal and fleet management advice fortnightly? Sign up free now