Landowner and director fined for illegally dumping waste

A waste haulage company director and a landowner have been fined £6,435 for illegally dumping thousands of tonnes of waste on farmland in Devon. Marie Sinead Berry, a director of CB Plant Hire, whose company transported waste to the Tiverton Motorcross site, admitted she had failed to carry out normal duty of care checks and had taken her eye off the ball.

In 2016, TB Plant Hire was contacted by a third party to use land off the A361 for the disposal of waste. But complaints were received and an Environment Agency officer visited the site and found waste was being deposited on a large scale.

Landowner Stephen Dibble had partially filled a valley and indications suggested he was intending to continue depositing more waste. He confirmed he was using the waste imported by CB Plant Hire to return the land back to agricultural use. A waste exemption allows landowners to reuse up to 1,000 tonnes of soil and subsoil for specific purposes but it was revealed Dibble had accepted more than﷯ 23,500 tonnes of waste at Tiverton Motocross and he lacked planning permission.

Appearing before Exeter Magistrates’ Court, Berry was fined £120 and £3,500 costs after pleading guilty to operating an unauthorised waste disposal facility. Dibble was fined £265 and ordered to pay £2,490 costs.

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Cambridgeshire haulier fined for avoidable fatality

A company has been fined £180,000, plus costs, after an employee died when he was struck by a lorry at its Cambridgeshire site.

Peterborough Crown Court heard how the driver at Camgrain Stores in Linton had checked his mirrors but he did not see Edward Orlopp, who was walking from the firm’s control room across the site when the incident occurred in July 2016. The vehicle struck Orlopp causing fatal injuries.

An HSE investigation found that Camgrain Stores had failed to ensure that pedestrians and vehicles could move safely around the site and that it had not provided measures to prevent employees walking into areas where large vehicles were moving.

The company pleaded guilty to breaching the Health & Safety at Work Act 1974 and was fined £180,000 and costs of £20,000.

HSE inspector Stephen Faulkner said: “Being struck by vehicles is one of the most common causes of workplace fatal accidents. This was a tragic and avoidable incident caused by failure of the company to undertake simple measures.”

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