Operator licensing - new forms for application/ variations, by Tim Ridyard, Woodfines Solicitors LLP

Further to the blog with regard to the letter being sent to all operators it should be noted that all application forms for grants or variations of any kind have now been very substantially re-drafted in layout, content and the information requested from applicants. Whilst ironing out some gremlins in previous versions they will need to be drafted with great care and attention to detail - information required about nominated transport managers is detailed. Comprehensive declarations need to be signed by both operators and transport managers.

For further queries or assistance with application: Tim Ridyard, Partner, Woodfines Solicitors LLP, Cambridge tridyard@woodfines.co.uk and 01223 411421

Continuous Insurance Enforcement in Force from Today

New laws have today been introduced that are designed to crack down on uninsured driving.

Continuous Insurance Enforcement affects all motorists, not just car drivers, meaning that haulage operators must also ensure they have not got any fleet vehicles uninsured. From 20 June the DVLA will have the power to clamp, seize and destroy a vehicle if it does not have valid insurance. Court action and fines of up to £1,000 will also be possible.

The regulations apply to any vehicle, even if they are not being used on the road, unless you possess a Statutory Off Road Notice (SORN).

In comparison to cars the numbers of trucks running around or parked up without any insurance will be small. However the Motor Insurers' Bureau says HGV drivers are included in the 1.4 million (4%) estimated to have no insurance.

 

Announcing the new law transport minister Mike Penning placed emphasis on the danger uninsured drivers cause, stating that they kill 160 and injure 23,000 people each year and cost everyone else £500m in extra premiums. However, it is already an offence to use a vehicle without insurance and so this law will simply run alongside existing ones enforced by the police. It is also questionable whether or not this move will have the desired effect of reducing premiums.

The Motor Accident Solicitors Society has previously told the Transport Select Committee that it was surprised that a reduction in the numbers of non-insurers over the last five years has not translated into a corresponding fall in premiums.

One reason might be the much bigger problems of fraud and personal injury claims, both of which have risen steeply recently, particulary 'crash for cash' scams, and are making insurance expensive for all of us.

For more information please contact Anton Balkitis or Lucy Wood on 0115 9100600 or visit them at http://www.keepmeontheroad.co.uk/